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Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables

Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables

Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables

  • ISBN13: 9780882667034
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BRAND NEW FROM PUBLISHER! 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!

Anyone can learn to store fruits and vegetables safely and naturally with a cool, dark space (even a closet!) and the step-by-step advice in this book.

List Price: $ 14.95

Price: $ 7.89

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12 Comments/Reviews

  • Gabriella Corbett says:

    All this concern by environmentalists about our carbon foot print seems a big deal of late. Now every thing from farting cows to the pets you have are being analyzed as to their impact in global warming.
    Well I got to thinking about this and I wonder if we hunters are unknowingly helping to fight global warming.
    You see (from what I understand) rising a cow and processing it for market meat has a much higher environmental impact than just shooting a deer to eat. By the time you add up all the energy from the ranchers equipment, feed, the energy to run the slaughter house and the processors, shipping, cold storage, the grocery store and your gas to get to the grocery store……well that’s more of a carbon imprint than driving to the woods and shooting a deer that ate natural food and didn’t require a dime of man made energy to raise.

    So could hunters claim they are saving the planet by hunting?
    Are we missing out on promoting hunting as eco friendly?
    Could it be hunters and wild food gatherers are actually more eco friendly than the average consumer? Or dare I say a vegetarian?

    Seems now they say eating your pet rabbit is better than keeping them as far as the carbon thing goes;
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20091220/lf_afp/lifestyleclimatewarminganimalsfood

  • Wendy A. B. Whipple says:
    271 of 275 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Very clear advice for hanging onto your harvest longer., September 24, 2002
    By 
    Wendy A. B. Whipple (Chicago, IL USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables (Paperback)

    This is a great book for (food) gardeners and for people who have some land available to them. Although there are suggestions for “nooks and crannies” in your house, most of those ideas sound like ideas for older (draftier) homes.

    The suggestions for building your own working root cellar are clear, with illustrations to help you plan. There are lists of things that keep well and under what conditions to keep them. The authors even list certain varieties of (for instance) apples that keep better than others. There’s a month-by-month plan of what could be coming out of your garden, going into the root cellar, and what could be canned or frozen. If you have a large garden, this is an incredibly useful book.

    However, those of us with smaller modern homes, smaller yards, and smaller, less heavily-producing gardens will be a little disappointed. As I read this, I came to the conclusion that it would be pretty darned difficult to have a root cellar on our property, because we don’t have a useable cool north corner to put one in. Not impossible, mind you, it would just take a lot more effort, planning, and money to build it.

    I recommend this book highly for people who raise substantial amounts of their own produce. This book will really extend your harvest. With imagination and a little time and effort, you can have a root cellar that keeps your family in fresh food you grew all year long.

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  • Erika Mitchell says:
    192 of 193 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Encyclopedia of no-energy food preservation, August 31, 2004
    By 
    Erika Mitchell (E. Calais, VT USA) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This book is a vast resource of information about root cellars, how to build them, and how to use them. The Bubels contend that even city apartments dwellers can arrange some sort of cold food storage area with a little imagination and a few suggestions from those who have done it before. The book has 6 parts: choosing good storage vegetable varieties, harvesting for keeping quality, storing crops in the root cellar, root cellar ideas for those who don’t currently have a root cellar, root cellaring experiences, and recipes. At the end of the book is a bibliography for further reading, a list of plant sources, and an index. The book is amply illustrated with diagrams and black-and-white photographs.

    I didn’t expect to find much in this book that I haven’t read elsewhere. Since my house didn’t come with a root cellar, I wasn’t very optimistic about finding anything in the book that I could use. Fortunately, I was way off-base in these assumptions. I was amazed at the variety and detail of information that the Bubels provide. The sections on choosing seed varieties and determining when to harvest are extremely useful, even if you’re only going to put your harvest in the refrigerator. They also explain the different types of storage conditions required for different crops- -some like it cool and moist, and others warmer and dry. But what gave me real hope was all the ideas about un-root cellars that people have constructed and made good use of for storing vegetables. Their examples include everything from insolated window baskets for apartment dwellers to buried package trucks. One idea that might work well for my situation at least for the time being is a buried refrigerator. Down the line, if I have extra time on my hands, I could trade up for a real dug root cellar, following the plans in the book. If you’re a gardener, you’ll find something of use for sure in this book.

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  • Anonymous says:
    75 of 75 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    This book gives the complete root cellaring picture., January 17, 1999
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables (Paperback)

    We’re fortunate to have bought a property with a well designed root cellar already in place. Until I read this book, I had no idea how a root cellar ‘worked’. This book suggests what foods are best for root cellaring, how long to expect to store them, and what temperatures should be maintained. Had I not read this book I would have wasted time and enery, and lost the nutrients in some foods by canning them rather than root cellaring them. A city dweller friend of mine borrowed my book and has decided to buy it. There are variety of good root cellar plans complete with illustrations and drawings for nearly any situation.

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  • Akeem Edwards says:

    Natural curiosity about our pets but the questions have never been answered. We have blind trust handing over our beloved pet to a mysterious crematorium that your vet say is reputable.

    Seeing other yahoo answers over and over about the ashes and what options are given i.e. private or communal are not the answers people are looking for.

    The mystery begins once the cremation service provider picks up the bagged and tagged animals from the cooler at the vet office. There are 3 tags…private, communal and other. A vet tech described this part to me because I asked where the deceased animals go at the office. She knew nothing else about the process.

    These are the questions that I feel never get answered but need to be answered.

    Do they have cold storage to take the pets to at the facility until the start of the cremation process?

    How are such a large volume of animals organized for the process of cremation?

    Do they have employees or is it a one man show?

    What does a cremation facility look like?

    What is the device used to burn the bodies?

    Is there a certain temperature required for cremation?

    How much time does the cremation take per animal?

    Do they do one at a time or many?

    How do they keep the animals separate if a private cremation is requested?

    How is each animal tracked through the process from start to finish?

    How much time does it usually take for each animal cremation?

    What does the animal look like after the cremation?

    What’s the next step after the animal cremation is completed?

    Does the bone become ash through the process?

    If not, how does the bone become ash?

    There are 3 tags..what happens to the “other” animals surrendered by owners who don’t want to pay for cremation.

    Isn’t it costly for the crematorium to burn them as well?

    Do these “other” animals get dumped in the dumpster while no one is watching?

    Who inspects and governs these operations?

    I honestly have never been able to get any of these questions answered completely and thoroughly to my satisifaction.

    The cremation business is a mystery and I’m not sure why we the people haven’t asked for more details. Why would we entrust just because they say it’s so without ever really being able to verify it?

    I think this type of business shouldn’t be a mystery but rather be opened up for those who really have that natural curiousity about it.

    If you can answer even just one of these questions, I’m sure those out in yahoo land would appreciate it.

  • dyzer de touchablee says:

    hello my father worked for the plants, he coordinated natural gas underground cavern storage drilling, well thursday april 8th he got woke up in the middle of the night, round 3am, he was in the plants, there was a gas leak somewhere with his equip, he went and helped a guy fix it, he held latter while guy tightened bolt for around 45 minutes, he said he was really worried about his lungs, cause they were burning, then he was having cold sweets while he was holding that latter, got him really worried, he came home later that morning cause he couldnt go back to sleep after, his back was hurting really bad, and he was worried about his lungs, my mom put cream on his back to help and at around 6pm april 8th he took a nap and died in his sleep at around 8pm, wondering what caused it and if in your opinion could it be related to this gas leak… he was 49 yr old never been to the doc for anything, but i know he had sleep apnea… dad told my mom all this before he took a nap that day they were gonna go to the casino at 9 and have a little fun
    full autopsy and toxicology done, april 9th, havent found anything out yet
    i was driving home from mississippi, my mom was the only one with him, and there the type that are scared of hospitals, and he was acting normal bubba when he got home besides the pain…

  • Hugo Goldfeld says:

    Everybody thinks that the global heating is centered in the increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s near surface air and oceans in recent decades, but how it increases this temperature?
    If the heating comes from the outside as they say, that would increase in also the rains proportionally and we had spoken of drought these last years.
    Reason why the only logical explanation is that this heat comes from within Earth. If the Earth’s mantle is directly underneath crust, (it’s smaller in the oceanic zones) In the mantle, temperatures range between 500°C-900°C (932°F-1,652°F the zone of contact with the crust. how the heat climbs to the surface, if it finds more “obstacles” in their way less heat will arrive at the surface:
    – In the oceanic zones the mantle is smaller and the temperature is smaller and also it crosses cold water levels so when it arrives at level zero its temperature is not sufficient to evaporate the water to form clouds and rain.
    – In the terrestrial zones it is where at the end of century XIX the heat has been increased what it has happened in the crust in that time?
    En 1859 Edwin Drake perforated the first oil well in Pensilvania.
    The storage of Carbon in the fossil deposits (coal, petroleum and natural gas) supposes a reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmospheric levels. If they free the fósil deposits the amount of carbon dioxide of the atmosphere is greater and we added to it that the possibilities of recycled are reduced when diminishing the wooded mass and vegetal.
    the warm of the interior trying to arrive at the surface and it finds with the fossil deposits. They retain that heat so that it does not leave to the surface. These fossil deposits do not have oxygen like the carbon dioxide that are used in the extinguishers,and other thermal insulators like plastic, fabric, etc. They are derived from these fossil deposits and in addition to change to these thermal insulators by other elements more conductors of the heat, as in the case of petroleum that they introduce water, the water carrys hotter to the surface. This heat arrives at the atmosphere where they are the Greenhouse effect gases. The atmosphere retains more heat and it still gives back to the Earth more energy causing a imbalance in the radiactive balance. It casuses air masses of different temperatures take place forts rains and wind (hurricanes, etc.), and electric activity
    We do not forget the tectonic plates, the increase of heat causes that there is a greater vulcanism and seismicity, and they move with more facility so they are producing more earthquakes, tidal waves (tsunami), volcanic eruptions, etc. They release more heat of interior. the governments are dedicated to prove their armament in the most unstable or fragile zones like France that bombs its atoll where it is the crater of the meteorite.

  • Emily McInerney says:

    White people claim that there white skin makes them superior intellectually. Really ? Is this a fact or a lie controlled by there inferiority complex?

    We all know that Melanin has far far more useful purposes then just protection from the sun , am I correct? We know that Melanin has the ability to store energy and is presented in the organs and brain of the body.

    So if this is all true then how could white skin human who lack a large amount of melanin in there bodies as well as there pineal gland calcified , Be superior to people who has evolved and adapted on a planet that has used the sun for thousands and thousands of years if not millions of years to create and maintain life?

    Are they Natural, in many ways on! let me bring up some examples of how un-natural they really are.

    We all know that animal and people are uniquely developed in there own environment, and that they can move to one area and adapted and developed .

    People of color and animal have no problem moving anywhere on this planet without any problems surviving. Yet lets look at the white man for a sec, if he is so natural just like the rest of us then how come he has a hard time adapting?

    If you look at US history , You would find that the Native Americans had to help the white people plenty of time survive in the cold and also taught them how to grow and storage food for the winter. Now how are whites adapted to cold if they couldn’t even handle that? If whites were also natural wouldn’t there skin become darker to adapted in hot environment?

    Now with logic and reasoning I can tell you that this white skin making them superior argument they give us is full of crap isn’t it? They can never darken there skin without the genetic help of color people. If people of color can move to hotter place and get there skin darker , why can’t white people? If people of color can survive better in the cold (Eskimos by the way have light brown skin and live in much colder places then whites did ) then why couldn’t white also do this well?

    I know many people said this once and ill say it again , color eyes ( green , blue , haze) White skin , And light colored hair ( Red, blond , White) are not evolved superior genetics!

    Do you agree

  • Camron Wright says:

    It involves self-sustainability and farmland. : )

    I want to own a farm, and I plan on living sustaining myself and selling the excess animals, plants, etc. I imagine that I am eventually going to have a mate and children, so this is just beginning as a two-person farm, and when I have more of a need, I’ll let the animals breed more. I’m going to split this question into two parts, the first part about the plants I want to own, the second about the animals.

    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-

    The Crops

    As for crops, I plan on setting aside at the least 12 acres. I don’t know as much about plants as I do animals. I know enough to plant and grow them and tell when there is something wrong, and for the most part fix it, but I’ve never grown to feed myself, and if I can’t grow well I’ll starve, so I need to learn more.

    1 acre wheat
    2 for hay
    3 for barley
    1 for corn
    1 for herbs
    2 for potatoes and carrots
    2 for other plants I don’t imagine I’d need in large amounts, such as cucumbers and strawberries

    I was also going to scatter fruit bearing trees such as apple and pear throughout my property for shade and food. What stinks is that they take a few years to start bearing.

    Qs:
    Are there any companies that sell trees that are mature and are already bearing a good amount of fruit?
    Are there any diseases that strike the plants I listed in particular, especially the barley, hay and wheat?
    Do you recommend certain storage and preserving methods for different plants? I was thinking of making either an underground or aboveground cold-storage with concrete walls, but I’m unsure about the ventilation methods, how deep I should make it.
    How do I keep away grainbugs? I plan on using natural methods to deter pests, like sand strips for slugs, vinegar-water sprays, allowing ladybugs, aphids, encouraging such activity, but I know storing large amount of grains and herbs will make them want to come to my food!
    Do any of those plants like special conditions, like sandy/clay soil, wether or not they’ll need wind-barriers, and where I should replant them after another plant? I heard that if you replant them where certain other plants were they grow better because the other plants give and take different nutrients to the soil.
    Should I introduce more worms into the soil so it’ll have more oxygen, or will they attract hungry moles?
    Should I keep bees so they’ll aid in pollenation, or will they get dangerous after a while?

    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-

    The Livestock

    I plan on starting out with:
    2 sows, a boar
    4 chickens and a rooster
    2 dairy cows
    4 female goats and a male goat
    2 male rabbits and 2 females

    Qs:
    Recommended breeds?
    What are vet costs to properly take care of them?
    How much food do they need/what does it cost?
    Diseases and disorders I should look out for/needed vaccinations?
    Recommended amount of space?
    Plants/substances that are toxic to them?
    Important facts about them I should note?

    I’m not totally a city slicker, so don’t coddle me or give me nondescript awnsers and treat me like I’ve never seen an animal before. I’ve owned the chickens before, and my grandmother had goats, but I never owned them so I know a little, but not enough to own them. The rabbits are easy to take care of and my agriculture class’ pet was a Flemish Giant, so I am familiar with their care, but I don’t want to make a mistake and mistreat one if I can help it.

    I plan on letting my cows graze, and I know I’ll need to supplement it with hay, but what is a good amount of acreage. I imagine if I calve them both every year, 14 acres would be a good start?

    I was also going to feed the goats, but I was going to let them pick through the pastures with the cows so they get a little more variety in their diet and some excersize. I also wanted to build them some stuff to climb on since I remembered my grandmother’s goats loved to climb. Any suggestions for safe things to climb up on?

    The chickens will be allowed to roam the gardens to take care of tomato worms, pick, etc, but I’ll supplement them with feed. Are there any good deterrents for foxes and hawks?

    The same with the rabbits, but I will keep them fenced in and bury the fence a good foot underground so they don’t escape because I know if I don’t, those little suckers will be GONE. I plan on breeding them for their meat and fur, selling it when I don’t eat it myself.

    Maybe I’ll only get one sow to start out with, I’m not sure. Since the other animals are sometimes picky eaters and I’m bound to have things that I won’t want to eat myself or are leftovers I’ll take advantage of the fact that they’re walking garbage disposals. Is there things about pigs I should know in particular, like if there is anythi

  • Lmao Lmao says:

    It involves self-sustainability and farmland. : )

    I want to own a farm, and I plan on living sustaining myself and selling the excess animals, plants, etc. I imagine that I am eventually going to have a mate and children, so this is just beginning as a two-person farm, and when I have more of a need, I’ll let the animals breed more. I’m going to split this question into two parts, the first part about the plants I want to own, the second about the animals.

    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-

    The Crops

    As for crops, I plan on setting aside at the least 12 acres. I don’t know as much about plants as I do animals. I know enough to plant and grow them and tell when there is something wrong, and for the most part fix it, but I’ve never grown to feed myself, and if I can’t grow well I’ll starve, so I need to learn more.

    1 acre wheat
    2 for hay
    3 for barley
    1 for corn
    1 for herbs
    2 for potatoes and carrots
    2 for other plants I don’t imagine I’d need in large amounts, such as cucumbers and strawberries

    I was also going to scatter fruit bearing trees such as apple and pear throughout my property for shade and food. What stinks is that they take a few years to start bearing.

    Qs:
    Are there any companies that sell trees that are mature and are already bearing a good amount of fruit?
    Are there any diseases that strike the plants I listed in particular, especially the barley, hay and wheat?
    Do you recommend certain storage and preserving methods for different plants? I was thinking of making either an underground or aboveground cold-storage with concrete walls, but I’m unsure about the ventilation methods, how deep I should make it.
    How do I keep away grainbugs? I plan on using natural methods to deter pests, like sand strips for slugs, vinegar-water sprays, allowing ladybugs, aphids, encouraging such activity, but I know storing large amount of grains and herbs will make them want to come to my food!
    Do any of those plants like special conditions, like sandy/clay soil, wether or not they’ll need wind-barriers, and where I should replant them after another plant? I heard that if you replant them where certain other plants were they grow better because the other plants give and take different nutrients to the soil.
    Should I introduce more worms into the soil so it’ll have more oxygen, or will they attract hungry moles?
    Should I keep bees so they’ll aid in pollenation, or will they get dangerous after a while?

    ————————————————————————————————————————————————-

    The Livestock

    I plan on starting out with:
    2 sows, a boar
    4 chickens and a rooster
    2 dairy cows
    4 female goats and a male goat
    2 male rabbits and 2 females

    Qs:
    Recommended breeds?
    What are vet costs to properly take care of them?
    How much food do they need/what does it cost?
    Diseases and disorders I should look out for/needed vaccinations?
    Recommended amount of space?
    Plants/substances that are toxic to them?
    Important facts about them I should note?

    I’m not totally a city slicker, so don’t coddle me or give me nondescript awnsers and treat me like I’ve never seen an animal before. I’ve owned the chickens before, and my grandmother had goats, but I never owned them so I know a little, but not enough to own them. The rabbits are easy to take care of and my agriculture class’ pet was a Flemish Giant, so I am familiar with their care, but I don’t want to make a mistake and mistreat one if I can help it.

    I plan on letting my cows graze, and I know I’ll need to supplement it with hay, but what is a good amount of acreage. I imagine if I calve them both every year, 14 acres would be a good start?

    I was also going to feed the goats, but I was going to let them pick through the pastures with the cows so they get a little more variety in their diet and some excersize. I also wanted to build them some stuff to climb on since I remembered my grandmother’s goats loved to climb. Any suggestions for safe things to climb up on?

    The chickens will be allowed to roam the gardens to take care of tomato worms, pick, etc, but I’ll supplement them with feed. Are there any good deterrents for foxes and hawks?

    The same with the rabbits, but I will keep them fenced in and bury the fence a good foot underground so they don’t escape because I know if I don’t, those little suckers will be GONE. I plan on breeding them for their meat and fur, selling it when I don’t eat it myself.

    Maybe I’ll only get one sow to start out with, I’m not sure. Since the other animals are sometimes picky eaters and I’m bound to have things that I won’t want to eat myself or are leftovers I’ll take advantage of the fact that they’re walking garbage disposals. Is there things about pigs I should know in particular, like if there is anythi

  • mastermune says:

    Natural curiosity about our pets but the questions have never been answered. We have blind trust handing over our beloved pet to a mysterious crematorium that your vet say is reputable.

    Seeing other yahoo answers over and over about the ashes and what options are given i.e. private or communal are not the answers people are looking for.

    The mystery begins once the cremation service provider picks up the bagged and tagged animals from the cooler at the vet office. There are 3 tags…private, communal and other. A vet tech described this part to me because I asked where the deceased animals go at the office. She knew nothing else about the process.

    These are the questions that I feel never get answered but need to be answered.

    Do they have cold storage to take the pets to at the facility until the start of the cremation process?

    How are such a large volume of animals organized for the process of cremation?

    Do they have employees or is it a one man show?

    What does a cremation facility look like?

    What is the device used to burn the bodies?

    Is there a certain temperature required for cremation?

    How much time does the cremation take per animal?

    Do they do one at a time or many?

    How do they keep the animals separate if a private cremation is requested?

    How is each animal tracked through the process from start to finish?

    How much time does it usually take for each animal cremation?

    What does the animal look like after the cremation?

    What’s the next step after the animal cremation is completed?

    Does the bone become ash through the process?

    If not, how does the bone become ash?

    There are 3 tags..what happens to the “other” animals surrendered by owners who don’t want to pay for cremation.

    Isn’t it costly for the crematorium to burn them as well?

    Do these “other” animals get dumped in the dumpster while no one is watching?

    Who inspects and governs these operations?

    I honestly have never been able to get any of these questions answered completely and thoroughly to my satisifaction.

    The cremation business is a mystery and I’m not sure why we the people haven’t asked for more details. Why would we entrust just because they say it’s so without ever really being able to verify it?

    I think this type of business shouldn’t be a mystery but rather be opened up for those who really have that natural curiousity about it.

    If you can answer even just one of these questions, I’m sure those out in yahoo land would appreciate it.

  • Netcycler UK wishes says:

    I prefer to have tea cooler or cold, but I do not know any good homemade recipes, online guides, or books for good flavors, proper preparation, and storage. As well as is it better to steep natural ingredients or to steep pouches(flavor and health wise). Basically I am a tea newbie, who wants to know what way should I make my tea, especially since I want it to be flavorful and cold in the end result, and what flavors are best cold or cool. And some books, recipes, and guides would be helpful too.

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