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Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods Reviews

Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods

Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods

For anyone who’s ever headed to their local farmers’ market reciting the mantra “I will not overbuy” but has lumbered home with bags overflowing with delicious summer strawberries, zucchini blossoms, and tomatoes, or autumn apples, pears, and cauliflower, this book will be your saving grace.

Well-Preserved is a collection of 30 small batch preserving recipes and 90 recipes in which to use the preserved goods. Preserving recipes like Marinated Baby Artichokes are followed by recipes for dishes like Marinated Artichoke and Ricotta Pie and Sausages with Marinated Baby Artichokes; a Three-Citrus Marmelade recipe is followed by recipes for Chicken Wings Baked with Three-Citrus Marmelade, Shrmp with Three-Citrus Marmelade and Lime, and Cr

List Price: $ 24.95

Price: $ 15.27

14 Comments/Reviews

  • Jackson Reams says:

    They are marinated in olive oil in a jar.

  • Amy W. Nymark "Amy Nymark" says:
    43 of 46 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Well Preserved is Well Done!, May 21, 2009
    By 
    Amy W. Nymark “Amy Nymark” (Minnesota) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods (Paperback)

    Although I’m always drawn to beautiful covers when viewing cooking/technique books – this beauty delivers on the inside, too. Being a beginner at jarring and canning – it can be intimidating to step into a world where usually the experts have been doing and observing techniques since they were young. This book is wonderful for the beginner – the steps – the techniques – the processes and the practicality comfort the reader and THANK YOU FOR THAT! Great approach to help us save food AND money! Amy Nymark

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  • J. Hurley "chippy hick" says:
    19 of 19 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Canning and preserving for the down-home gourmet, June 25, 2009
    By 
    J. Hurley “chippy hick” (Bucks County, PA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods (Paperback)

    I got this book out at the library and now it is on my wishlist. It is a definite keeper. I have used many books on canning and preserving. This is the one I find most inspirational.

    If you want to know the basics about canning get the Ball Blue Book. That will deliver bulk recipes for many different types of produce albeit with few pictures and little description.

    Well-Preserved is the other end of the spectrum. It goes beyond canning and offers recipes for curing, smoking, freezing, and preserving in oil. It has lovely photos and descriptions of each of the 29 “master recipes” as well as several mouth-watering recipies using each of the preserved foods. This book will make you want to prepare, share, and eat the bounty of your garden with style.

    If I want to know how to make strawberry jam I’ll grab the Ball Blue Book. However, if I want to lovingly prepare Concord Grape Walnut Conserve to tuck into those holiday packages with a little note suggesting to use it to top baked brie, or turn into a tart, or use as stuffing for a dessert ravioli, it is Well-Preserved I will reach for.

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  • M. Hill says:
    19 of 20 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    So Much More Than a Canning Cookbook, November 3, 2009
    By 
    M. Hill (U.S.A.) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods (Paperback)

    Well-Preserved is not a compendium of canning recipes. Why does this need to be stated? Because the cover of the book pictures an attractive arrangement of filled canning jars so readers may rightfully deduce this is an encyclopedia of canning recipes. Further, the title “Well-Preserved: recipes and techniques for putting up small batches of seasonal foods” taken at face value, would lead a reader to believe the book contains nothing but canning recipes. This too is not an accurate representation of the contents of the book. The cookbook only contains 29 recipes for canning, freezing and curing, and 88 recipes that illustrate how the author uses the canned and preserved foods. Confused? Well, a look at the other reviews would indicate a number of readers are confused and annoyed the book didn’t deliver what they expected. To make matters worse, another book was released almost to the day, in May 2009, with a nearly identical title, so potentially some of the purchasers of this book may have thought they were buying that book.

    This is such an unfortunate circumstance for the author, Eugenia Bone, because she has created a very special cookbook. As much a writer as a chef, she lavishly shares her stories and by the end of the book, the reader has entered the life of Ms. Bone and knows as much about her and how she learned a technique or where she buys her produce or the story behind a recipe or about her apartment in New York City or her cabin in Colorado or her children and husband as about canning and preserving. If only the book had a title like “Recipes Using Foods Preserved at Home” the criticisms would be non-existent.

    Clearly, this is not a book for someone strictly seeking canning recipes – there are only 17 actual canning recipes, the remaining 12 recipes involve other methods of preservation such as refrigerator or freezer techniques. But, books filled with canning recipes are easy to find. This is a book filled with ideas on how to creatively use foods preserved at home. Ms. Bone carefully explains how to properly can and preserve, launches into the recipes she turns to time and again to create these preserved foods and then follows with recipes utilizing the preserved goods – a complete circle. Will I follow what she does to the letter? No, but as she tosses excellent ideas out by the handful she gives the reader ideas for other combinations and ways to use the preserved foods, all things I will definitely apply in my cooking.

    I did not plan on reading the book from cover to cover but I did. I also had no plans to write a review defending the book, but as an avid canner I learned much from the book – just not what I expected to learn. No one wants to waste hard earned money or precious time, but this book, in its proper context, is cohesive and filled with value. Sometimes we head-out on a trip and end-up off the path on what results in a much better adventure. That’s what this book is – a scenic excursion.

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  • Kentrell Thornton says:

    I’m tired of asking for recipes and getting something from another site. If I ask for a good Spicy Honey-BBQ sauce, or a orange braised chicken recipe I’ll look online first, and then come here if I can’t find what I want, or want a more personal recipe.

    Is there anyone on here that has their own recipes?

  • Andrea V Lewis says:

    Like organic foods or just healthy foods with fiber and stuff like that? Why is it more expensive to live a healthy lifestyle? Why is it more expensive for foods that come straight from the source versus foods that have adatives to make them last longer and processed foods and foods that have a whole bunch of extra ingredients???

    It is just something I have not come to understand. Any thoughts?

  • Phantom Gear says:

    I am preparing a recipe tomorrow that uses (drained) marinated artichokes. Is there any recipe/dish I can make that utilizes the marinade or do I simply need to throw it out? (I am a vegetarian).

  • Noelle Biza says:

    I used to buy them in packages of two (about 20 oz per jar) at Sams for about $8.

  • Jonathan Hicks says:

    If they have 2 jobs and one is seasonal, but the other one isn’t, do they still get unemployment from the seasonal job for the few months they are off?
    I was just curious. I know people that draw unemployment while they are off for 2 months until they are able to go back to work. I was just wondering if they have 2 jobs and one of them closes down for 2 months out of the winter if they could still collect unemployment? Didn’t think so though.

  • alnser says:

    They are marinated in water, vinegar, olive oil, salt, citric acid and ascorbic acid and have been kept in the glass jar they came in.

  • ARiPToday says:

    I always thought that farmers’ markets were places where you can buy local and organic stuff. However, when I checked out the one we have here in Galway, there was prepacked stuff from the continent as well, and it didn’t have the organic label. So now I’m wondering about the other things sold there. Is it organic? Is it local? How can I find out?

  • Henriette Tappa says:

    I’m 18 and he looks the same age and he is so cute! I not only go to the farmers’ market for the produce, but so I can talk to him! Last time, he complimented me and even gave me a discount on something I bought from him. I think he may be interested in me too, but how can I start talking to him more and get to know him? How can I let him know I’m interested in him?

  • 1hardcoregamer says:

    What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?What are the small compounds that make proteins called and what do proteins do inside the cell?

  • Jonathan Carvalho says:

    I always thought that farmers’ markets were places where you can buy local and organic stuff. However, when I checked out the one we have here in Galway, there was prepacked stuff from the continent as well, and it didn’t have the organic label. So now I’m wondering about the other things sold there. Is it organic? Is it local? How can I find out?

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