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Excalibur 2500 Food Dehydrator – 5 Tray

Excalibur 2500 Food Dehydrator – 5 Tray – Black – Food Dryer Kitchen Appliance – Food Storage & More

  • 5 Trays – 15″ x 15″ – 8 Sq. Ft. of Drying Area
  • Adjustable Thermostat – 85 to 155 Degrees
  • 5″ Fan – 400 Watts, 110 Volts, 60 Hz.
  • 5 Year Limited Warranty
  • Free 24 Page Recipe Booklet Included

Why Dehydrate?

Save Money- Buy food on sale, in bulk, or in season and save 50%or more
Great taste- All Excalibur models are a “flavor concentrators” each bite is a mouth watering burst of flavor
Easy- Wash, slice and dry. Much easier than canning or freezing
Quick- Excalibur dries from 2 to 10 times faster than most other dehydrators
Space Saving- Dried Foods Reduce in size and store easier than canned or frozen
Healthy- Drying preserves nutrients and enzymes/ no additive or preservatives

Why Excalibur?

Only Excalibur offers the Turbo Charge Parallexx® Drying System. Millions have re-discovered the benefits of food dehydration. Healthy, nutritious and tasty food at a huge savings. Excalibur makes drying easy. For centuries food has been dried in the sun or open air- a lengthy, messy and difficult process inviting contamination and spoilage. With the introduction of electric dehydrators the drying process was improved. But most manufactures offered round stackab

List Price: $ 189.95

Price: $ 159.95

Related Freeze Dried Food Storage Products

6 Comments/Reviews

  • welty4009 says:

    I’ve gotten into making from scratch a particular cheese straw recipe, but my current method is very time consuming. It involves first blending softened butter with grated cheese. Then, I have to blend in a large amount of sifted flour containing small amounts of other dry ingredients. I only have a regular hand mixer, and the dough quickly begins to build and bind up on it, causing the motor to overwork. I wind up mixing it as best I can, then taking several minutes to scrape the clinging dough off the mixer blades and mixing the dough more thoroughly with a spoon. There MUST be a better way, but I don’t know if I should invest in a better mixer, a food processor, or just get one of those inexpensive, wire dough blenders that are hand-held. The amount of finished dough I wind up with using this recipe is about two to three cups worth. Any advice from more experienced bakers?

  • Raphael Santi says:

    I’ve gotten into making from scratch a particular cheese straw recipe, but my current method is very time consuming. It involves first blending softened butter with grated cheese. Then, I have to blend in a large amount of sifted flour containing small amounts of other dry ingredients. I only have a regular hand mixer, and the dough quickly begins to build and bind up on it, causing the motor to overwork. I wind up mixing it as best I can, then taking several minutes to scrape the clinging dough off the mixer blades and mixing the dough more thoroughly with a spoon. There MUST be a better way, but I don’t know if I should invest in a better mixer, a food processor, or just get one of those inexpensive, wire dough blenders that are hand-held. The amount of finished dough I wind up with using this recipe is about two to three cups worth. Any advice from more experienced bakers?

  • we love you says:

    not exactly a physical store, online store is also ok. can you provide me a link? small household appliance including hair dryer, coffee maker, bread maker, vacum cleaner, kitchen scale, mixer, food processor and so on

  • waldo g says:

    1. A kitchen has three major work flows where you store, prepare, cook, and serve food.
    2. Spoilage must be practiced in the kitchen to prevent food-borne illnesses.
    3. The cook’s personal hygiene, or individual cleanliness, contributes to the safety of food preparation_
    4. Contaminants are remedies to counteracts poison.
    5. The ideal arrangement for the work areas of a kitchen is a work triangle.
    6. Any warm, moist sunlit place in the kitchen is ideal for dry storage.
    7. Calcium is an important mineral that provide energy.
    8. In the process of pasteurization, milk under pressure is forced through small openings to break up the fat particles so that they will not rise to the top.
    9. Fortified milk has had vitamin D added to it.
    10. Certified milk has been produced under very strict sanitary conditions.
    11. The order in which tasks are done is called work center.
    12. Botulism is the most deadly form of blood poisoning.
    13. Appliances with plugs having three prongs are grounded appliances
    14. Sanitation is a change in food caused by enzymes or by microorganisms,
    15. Microorganisms are tiny living things that may be poisonous or that may cause changes in food.

  • Martin Lee Grant says:

    We had a flood after the hurricane Irene. House has no basement, so the whole first floor got flooded. 10″ of water stayed inside the house for about 3-4 hours. We didn’t have to drain it, it just went away by itself (the same way it got in, from the canal). On the first floor we have a living room, laundry room + boiler, small bathroom, one big closet, one small closet and large kitchen; every room has hardwood floors, except kitchen. All the rooms got flooded. Right now we are in the process of filing the claim with the food insurance. We had to move out, since nothing is working (no hot water, washer is not working etc.). I am afraid that the floors will curve with time, even though we dried it. Kitchen will have to be changed completely, since current kitchen is not a solid wood and even though we have dried it, it already got mold in all of the bottom cabinets. All the appliances are not working… I would like to hear some comments on how the insurance process works, since we have never filed insurance claims before? How long will it take to settle case like this? And if someone had similar situation, what the approximate settlement should we expect. And pretty much any kind of input/advise will be more then welcome.
    Thanks everyone in advance 🙂

  • Miss Mossey says:

    We had a flood after the hurricane Irene. House has no basement, so the whole first floor got flooded. 10″ of water stayed inside the house for about 3-4 hours. We didn’t have to drain it, it just went away by itself (the same way it got in, from the canal). On the first floor we have a living room, laundry room + boiler, small bathroom, one big closet, one small closet and large kitchen; every room has hardwood floors, except kitchen. All the rooms got flooded. Right now we are in the process of filing the claim with the food insurance. We had to move out, since nothing is working (no hot water, washer is not working etc.). I am afraid that the floors will curve with time, even though we dried it. Kitchen will have to be changed completely, since current kitchen is not a solid wood and even though we have dried it, it already got mold in all of the bottom cabinets. All the appliances are not working… I would like to hear some comments on how the insurance process works, since we have never filed insurance claims before? How long will it take to settle case like this? And if someone had similar situation, what the approximate settlement should we expect. And pretty much any kind of input/advise will be more then welcome.
    Thanks everyone in advance 🙂

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