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The Essentials Emergency Kit

The Essentials Emergency Kit

  • Lightweight, weather-resistant backpack
  • 2-week food supply, 3 meals per day
  • 1500+ use water filter
  • Reusable heat source
  • Cooking tin

Each item in The Essentials Kit Backpack is individually packaged and sealed for freshness. All of our meals are either ready-to-eat or require only water to prepare, and have a shelf life of 7-10 years.

Price: $ 209.99

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13 Comments/Reviews

  • Hells Angel says:

    I just got my first period today (that really sucks cuz christmas is in less than 2 days) and i wanted to know some essentials for what i should keep in my locker and my backpack so that i have everything that i need when i need to change my pad or tampon (i’m not really planning on using those till over the summer)

  • Damien Goosby says:

    Wilderness survival – prepare for the worst

    10 Essential items to bring

    1. Extra food and water.
    Extra food means food that is not part of a planned meal or snack, food you do not expect to eat. So you won’t be tempted to eat it except in case of emergency, it probably should not be one of your favorites. It does not have to be a large quantity. It probably will not keep you from starving, but it might give you some comfort as well as a few calories to burn to keep you warm. One or two high-energy sports bars might be a good choice. Always carry a full liter of water, and keep it full. Refill at every water source. The next source may be a long way off. Always keep some iodine in your emergency kit (as long as you are not allergic to it) whether or not you travel with a filter in your pack.

    2. Extra clothing.
    This, too, is gear you do not expect to use. A polypropylene or wool sweater is fine. Even better is a small Mylar space blanket, the kind that comes folded up in a little cellophane package about 2 inches by 4 inches. Add a couple of 30-gallon trash bags, 2 or 3 millimeters thick if you can find them. These are extremely compact, weigh practically nothing, and can be tucked into your emergency kit and forgotten until needed. Garbage bags make good rain and wind protection. They can also be used for gathering food, insulating, as fire-making material, for forming part of a shelter, or for melting snow.

    3. Map.
    A topographic map is essential for any wilderness navigation. It also can be tucked inside your clothes for insulation or used to leave notes or directions addressed to potential rescuers.

    4. Compass.
    Be sure you know how to use both a map and compass or they won’t do you much good. If your compass is the type with a mirror, it can double as a signaling device.

    5. Flashlight with Extra Batteries and Bulb.
    A small AA-battery light is fine. Its most important use is for reading a map, and perhaps for signaling. You will probably find that if it is absolutely necessary to walk after dark, starlight alone provides enough light once your night vision adjusts and you are sure of your footing.

    6. Sunglasses and sunscreen.
    These might not be critical for wandering through the Eastern woods, but they are absolutely essential for survival in deserts, on snow, or in high mountains above timberline where the atmosphere is thin. Sunburn can lead to severe dehydration. The same conditions can cause snow blindness, a particularly painful, though usually temporary, condition that can occur within less than an hour’s exposure, though the symptoms may not show up until eight hours later.

    7. Matches in a waterproof container.
    The wooden strike-anywhere variety is best. Just be sure to store them in such a way that they cannot rub against one another and light themselves. An airtight pill bottle or film canister will keep both oxygen and water out.

    8. Fire starter or candle.
    In rain or wind a match will not stay lit long enough to ignite damp tinder. A candle, or even a small piece of candle at least a half-inch in diameter will give a more lasting flame. Better yet is fire starter, available at outfitting stores in several forms, from tablets or small blocks of paraffin or other flammable material to a gel that squeezes from a tube.

    9. Pocket knife or utility tool.
    One simple blade will do, though the models with scissors, saws, tweezers, screwdrivers, and other utility tools are handy for preparing tinder, preparing food, first aid, equipment repair, and almost any other task you can imagine.

    10. First-aid kit.
    Your kit should include a few alcohol swabs or moist towelettes, antibiotic ointment, aspirin or ibuprofen, Band-Aids, small tweezers, and scissors. Also include whatever prescription drugs you take regularly. If you travel alone or carry the main kit for a group, take a more elaborate kit. See Wilderness First Aid by Gilbert Preston (Falcon, 1997) for a thorough discussion of wilderness first-aid kits.

  • defdealcom says:

    i have been asked to pick the top 8 things needed in an emergency flood kit, the list of things that were given to us are:
    A torch
    A battery powered radio
    A tin opener
    a tin of food
    Money
    Mobile phone
    emergency numbers to ring
    insurance policy information
    bread
    blankets
    bottle of water
    First aid kit
    rubber gloves
    and clean clothes
    Any help will be much appreciated! xxx

  • Bettina Tefft says:

    You see them for sale on bridal websites, but I thought it would be a cute idea to make up little kits for the bridal party. What sort of items should be included in a wedding emergency kit?
    What are some essential items that a Bride, Groom, Groomsmen, or Bridesmaids need to have on hand?

    What sort of things did you have at your wedding in case of mishap? Or what sort of things did you wish you had at your wedding?

    Do you think a little ” wedding survival kit” would make a cute gift to give prior to the wedding?

    For those of you who did give these as gifts, did you make your own or buy them?

  • Jess Lornie says:

    I’m making an emergency survival kit for personal use for the off chance I might get lost on a hike while camping (for a merit badge in Boy Scouts) and I would like to customize it to be able to let you live off of the most common type of fish in Virginia and the surrounding states. I need to know what that fish is, what the bare essentials are for catching it, and how many calories it will have per fish. I currently have an all-purpose lure and premium fishing line as materials for the job.

  • Andy Shimkus says:

    Me and my German Shepherd mix are going to take an overnight hiking trip. He and I have hiked before, but it’s little 3 hour trips over the mountain in town, and I’ve made the hike we are taking tomorrow before, even when I was little so I trust the spot we are hiking for both of our skill levels. I have the basics packed: water, first aid kit, emergency supplies, etc. I also have basics packed for him: extra leash, treats, a hitch leash for tie out, a pocket dog first aid guide, poop bags, food and portable bowl. At least two of my bottles are wide mouthed with big lids that can turn into water bowls for the dog, I have a calorie-high energy paste for him, and heavy duty dog boots. His collar, harness, and backpack are all tagged with his name. My brother is coming along too, so there will be an extra back pack for supplies. (He is a sight to see. Everyone on our normal hike has heard of him, and some have even asked to take pictures because people will never believe them.) He is conditioned to wear his pack, and I packed it fairly light (not over 5 lbs, on a 70 lb dog) and there is space in my bag for his if it is too much.

    But, this is a longer trip and much farther from home (and we are staying the night, hopefully at the camp site below so that we can get an early start. This is kind of a test trip for much longer, nicer hikes later on. Everything I have packed, most times, seems overkill, but I was always taught that is was better to have it and not need it to need it and not have it.

    So, dog hikers/campers, what have you added to your packs that you have found invaluable? Any funny stories, or advice to give about our extended trip to give me warning of what to expect?

  • Armel Mendoza says:

    OK I have seen talks of a .45 acp being useless against bear, but there have been reports of a 1911 equipped with a mech tech CCU upper being capable of stopping a bear.

    How accurate is this?
    What kind of bear did it stop? A cub, full grown, grizzly???

    On another note, how effective would a .45 long colt cartridge be against a bear? If it is effective, which bears can it stop?

    I am just wondering as I am trying to build an emergency kit and was wondering if I had to utilize something else like a .357 or 5.56mm. I would prefer to keep within a pistol caliber or an AR-15 pistol.

    This kit would contain essentials plus a lee portable reloader to make loads on the go.

    Please keep in mind that I do understand the potential uselessness of a 5.56mm but if it does have penetrating power with a hollow point and is capable (or if there are reports that may not be worldwide documented) I would appreciate the information.

    Also, IF the .45 acp is not effective enough, what is the minimal caliber capable of doing so.

    Thanks in advance
    Added: but does the mech tech CCU have the ability to stop a bear is the primary question. The other questions are more secondary.
    Again, thanks in advance.

  • Thais says:

    To be fully prepared for a tornado, earthquake,tsunami,big flood?

    Have your parents,teachers guided you during your secondary sch yrs?

    Tks for your time and effort! :-))

  • bobmacans says:

    in terms of, an emergency kit – but I dont want you to list every handy life saving device/gadget/tool you can think of – no.

    i want 5.

    5 items that YOU would choose and have in your car /car boot.

    here are what I think most of you might pick.

    Rope
    Torch
    Large Bottle of Water
    swiss army knife
    emergency flares
    mini first aid kit
    spare dry clothes
    box of matches/cigerette lighter
    high energy snack/choc bars &/or biscuits/crisps

    those are just some i thought up of, as being obvious choices.

    I want to see how the answers differ between men and women or if we both think the same way about ‘survival’ heh

    so, you may use 5 from that list or add some important ones i missed out. but only pick 5.

  • morgan mcmanus says:

    what are the school bag and purse essentials. What do I really need to keep in my school bag and purse? What do all 6th grade+ girls need in their bags? I like to carry everything and be organized so what are the things you should carry in your
    – school bag and
    – purse
    feel free to put things that aren’t essential or just what you have in your bag!
    P.S any ideas for an emergency kit like hair ties lip balm etc
    thanks please include EVERYTHING
    advice, opinions, ideas, links, anything please help!

    thaaanks. X

  • meghan bonham says:

    Wilderness survival – prepare for the worst

    10 Essential items to bring

    1. Extra food and water.
    Extra food means food that is not part of a planned meal or snack, food you do not expect to eat. So you won’t be tempted to eat it except in case of emergency, it probably should not be one of your favorites. It does not have to be a large quantity. It probably will not keep you from starving, but it might give you some comfort as well as a few calories to burn to keep you warm. One or two high-energy sports bars might be a good choice. Always carry a full liter of water, and keep it full. Refill at every water source. The next source may be a long way off. Always keep some iodine in your emergency kit (as long as you are not allergic to it) whether or not you travel with a filter in your pack.

    2. Extra clothing.
    This, too, is gear you do not expect to use. A polypropylene or wool sweater is fine. Even better is a small Mylar space blanket, the kind that comes folded up in a little cellophane package about 2 inches by 4 inches. Add a couple of 30-gallon trash bags, 2 or 3 millimeters thick if you can find them. These are extremely compact, weigh practically nothing, and can be tucked into your emergency kit and forgotten until needed. Garbage bags make good rain and wind protection. They can also be used for gathering food, insulating, as fire-making material, for forming part of a shelter, or for melting snow.

    3. Map.
    A topographic map is essential for any wilderness navigation. It also can be tucked inside your clothes for insulation or used to leave notes or directions addressed to potential rescuers.

    4. Compass.
    Be sure you know how to use both a map and compass or they won’t do you much good. If your compass is the type with a mirror, it can double as a signaling device.

    5. Flashlight with Extra Batteries and Bulb.
    A small AA-battery light is fine. Its most important use is for reading a map, and perhaps for signaling. You will probably find that if it is absolutely necessary to walk after dark, starlight alone provides enough light once your night vision adjusts and you are sure of your footing.

    6. Sunglasses and sunscreen.
    These might not be critical for wandering through the Eastern woods, but they are absolutely essential for survival in deserts, on snow, or in high mountains above timberline where the atmosphere is thin. Sunburn can lead to severe dehydration. The same conditions can cause snow blindness, a particularly painful, though usually temporary, condition that can occur within less than an hour’s exposure, though the symptoms may not show up until eight hours later.

    7. Matches in a waterproof container.
    The wooden strike-anywhere variety is best. Just be sure to store them in such a way that they cannot rub against one another and light themselves. An airtight pill bottle or film canister will keep both oxygen and water out.

    8. Fire starter or candle.
    In rain or wind a match will not stay lit long enough to ignite damp tinder. A candle, or even a small piece of candle at least a half-inch in diameter will give a more lasting flame. Better yet is fire starter, available at outfitting stores in several forms, from tablets or small blocks of paraffin or other flammable material to a gel that squeezes from a tube.

    9. Pocket knife or utility tool.
    One simple blade will do, though the models with scissors, saws, tweezers, screwdrivers, and other utility tools are handy for preparing tinder, preparing food, first aid, equipment repair, and almost any other task you can imagine.

    10. First-aid kit.
    Your kit should include a few alcohol swabs or moist towelettes, antibiotic ointment, aspirin or ibuprofen, Band-Aids, small tweezers, and scissors. Also include whatever prescription drugs you take regularly. If you travel alone or carry the main kit for a group, take a more elaborate kit. See Wilderness First Aid by Gilbert Preston (Falcon, 1997) for a thorough discussion of wilderness first-aid kits.

  • Gloria Hester says:

    what are the school bag and purse essentials. What do I really need to keep in my school bag and purse? What do all 6th grade+ girls need in their bags? I like to carry everything and be organized so what are the things you should carry in your
    – school bag and
    – purse
    feel free to put things that aren’t essential or just what you have in your bag!
    P.S any ideas for an emergency kit like hair ties lip balm etc
    thanks please include EVERYTHING
    advice, opinions, ideas, links, anything please help!

    thaaanks. X

  • Cecilia Osburn says:

    I need to make a bug out bag fairly cheaply and will have a chance to go shopping this week – I need essentials? (Bug out bags are bags that you use in emergencies, also called PERKs – Personal Emergency Response Kit or simply survival kits) Could you give me a list of the essentials?

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