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Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)

Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)

Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red)

  • AM (520-1710 KHz) & FM (87-108MHz) NOAA weatherband & 8211
  • USB cell phone charger (USB cable not included) 3.5 mm headphone input Dimensions: 5.25& 8221
  • Accessories: owner& 8217;s manual, warranty card Specifications subject to change

Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power, and Cell Phone Charger

List Price: $ 40.00

Price: $ 28.00

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8 Comments/Reviews

  • Ambergris "John Thomas" says:
    564 of 570 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Best Solar Powered Radio For The Price….No Battery Option, September 2, 2009
    By 
    Ambergris “John Thomas” (New England…..USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red) (Electronics)

    Weather radios are sort of a hobby of mine. There is just about no place I can go on my property that there isn’t one within reach somewhere. Six different brands are represented presently by what I own, including a more expensive Eton that is not my best radio. This small, (and I mean small) new line from Eton is a whole new animal to be sure. Its controls and design are very user friendly. And the reception on all channels, including the weather, is very loud and clear. Its true that the dial numbers for the AM FM are very small as some other reviewers have mentioned and can make it hard to tune accurately. But that is something common, as well as for me expected in a radio so small. What sets this unit apart from all the others I own in my opinion is its price and solar power. It is without a doubt the cheapest weather radio I have come across that is solar powered. Big, small, or otherwise. Even though one has been able to buy solar powered calculators at discount stores for less than $10 for years now, for some reason the weather radio industry has treated solar power as something still high tech and to be appreciated only in their most expensive units. My only other solar powered radio cost me over $60. The only possible down side that I should mention about this radio is that it does not take batteries. It would have been nice if they included that option. But they didn’t and its either the solar power or crank. This could be a very big negative for some folks who would feel comfortable knowing they could just stick some batteries in it if all else fails. Although 90% of the time the solar power is all you should ever need, if you will routinely keep this in a rather dark place, or happen to be lost out in the savage wilderness someplace with this radio in a continuous cloud cover, be ready to do a whole heap of crankin’. All in all, its finally nice to see a very reasonably priced unit that is solar powered and of a very quality build and design as well. I highly recommend the Eton for a portable unit that can be taken anywhere easily, powered effortlessly, and gives quality performance all in one package….

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  • Alex Hokanson says:

    I am a volunteer for the American Red Cross, and have been for several years. I am on call after-hours for Armed Forces Emergency Service needs (I help families of those serving in the armed forces to get messages to their soldier / sailor / marine / airman, and vice versa.).

    After a very few, but very well-publicized, instances of misconduct on the part of Red Cross workers in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the organization has declared that no one may volunteer without submitting to not only an CRIMINAL background check, but also a CREDIT inquiry.

    If I were in a position to have my hand in the cookie jar, as it were, I would be better able to understand this. As it is, I am doing a job for which they would have to hire someone — a job that intrudes on my personal life considerably, with calls at all hours of the night. In effect, I have chosen to do them a favor, and yet they want to know if I pay my JC Penney bill on time, or if I have a student loan.

    What say you?

  • Mark Wagner says:
    213 of 215 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Pleasantly surprised with the battery life, November 29, 2009
    By 

    This review is from: Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red) (Electronics)

    This radio is an excellent radio for the price. No, it is not a top-end emergency radio, but it should work rather well for anyone looking for a basic AM/FM/Weather radio with both a solar and hand-crank charging option. I purchased mine about a year ago and used it only occasionally for the first few months. Then I placed it on a shelf with limited light and there it sat for about six to eight months. About six weeks ago I dusted it off and it actually worked for about an hour or so with no hand-crank charging. Later that day I sat it in the front window where it would get plenty of direct sun light. A couple days later I picked it up from the window and have been using it a few hours each day since; some of those days it was used for more than six hours in the basement. I have not needed to crank it at all, but did crank charge it for about one minute total just while playing with it – for the record. Since then, I have been keeping it on the shelf out in the open where it is exposed to normal room daylight, no direct sunlight. The charging light does not light up in this setting, and I would not expect it to. I have occasionally taken it out on the front porch to sit a listen where there is direct sunlight, but only for about an hour or so each week. I really like the idea of not having to buy batteries, and the convenience of knowing I always have a charged radio.

    The flashlight is minimal, but I would not expect more from an LED light source. I have my 6-D-Cell Mag light if I need a powerful (luxury) light source.

    Tuning the radio is a bit sensitive and can be difficult to fine tune. I would consider this to be a SIGNIFICANT problem for an elderly person or anyone without the use of fine motor skills in their hands; but for me it is a minor hassle I am willing and able to deal with. I have considered getting the Eaton FR600 for its digital tuner. The reviews for that model suggest the battery life is pretty bad, so I have decided to wait for an improved model. For now, my FR160 is just fine. I would consider giving this 5-stars if the fine-tuning was much easier.

    The USB charge does work, but know that it will not charge an iPhone 3Gs. This is more a problem/restriction of the iPhone 3Gs (a widely discussed complaint across the Internet for many-many generic charging devices) and is not because of the radio. Charging my old Samsung phone was not a problem.

    The weather bands do pick up a signal, but to be absolutely honest, I have not used it much to provide any real opinion.

    The hand-crank charger feels solid enough (I wouldn’t abuse it) and tucks away securely when not used. I have found the manual crank-charger will provide about 25-30 minutes of radio time (at about 1/4 to 1/3 volume) for every minute of crank-charging. I average about 2 cranks per second or about 120 rotation per minute. Now I just count to 120 or so instead of watching the clock. This play-time per craink-time yeild has been very acceptable for me. After two minutes of crank-charging my hand does begins to tire a little, but just a little. If I leave the radio in a place with good direct sunlight when not using it, changing via the crank is never even needed.

    In short, it works for what I want – a radio that that can be charged by sunlight or by hand-crank when absolutely necessary. If you want the construction and feature-set of a $100+ radio – buy a $100+ radio. But, for $30 (or less), I am pleased with the FR160.

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  • William L. Drevo, Jr. "Bill Drevo, Jr." says:
    104 of 107 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Perfect Emergency Radio!, September 4, 2009
    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Etón American Red Cross ARCFR160R Microlink Self-Powered AM/FM/NOAA Weather Radio with Flashlight, Solar Power and Cell Phone Charger (Red) (Electronics)

    The reasons this Eton-manufactured emergency radio is the ideal emergency radio are: 1) small, compact size, 2) shock-absorbing case, 3) sensitive AM/FM/NOAA Weather tuner picks up weak signals, 4) handy 3-LED flashlight on left-hand end of the radio’s case, 5) Earphone jack under dust cover on the right-hand side of the case, 6) USB port under same dust cover on the right-hand side of the case, 7) All radio bands will run 4-5 hours at low volume on full charge of the internal NiMH battery, 8) Solar panel on top of the radio’s case is strong enough to power the radio indefinitely (as long as the solar panel is ‘seeing’ daylight), 9) the internal NiMH can be re-charged via the solar panel during daylight hours, an external transformer or the hand-cranked dynamo. You get all of these features for the low price of $30, plus free ‘Super Saver’ shipping from Amazon.Com. You can pay a lot more for an emergency radio and get a whole lot less!

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  • Joseph says:

    The pool I work at has a rule that says if there are more than 25 people in the pool, a second guard must go out on deck. What is the number according to the American Red Cross?

  • Marcus Yamaguchi says:

    In my class we kind of have to write a research paper. Mine is on the American Red Cross , part of this paper is to wite a bibliography. I can’t remember what a bibliography is, i know how retarded, and how do i write one on the red cross.

  • LastQueeen says:

    I am taking a course in First Aid by the American Red Cross and I need to pass the test on First Aid with a 80%. My teacher said it is 15 questions and I am worried because there is a lot of information. I read the manual but I am not sure if I will remember all of it after all I can only get 4 wrong. Does any one have any tips that has already taken it? What should I focus on? Should I memorize numbers?

  • Malik Dante says:

    Any helpful suggestions please on book titles to look for that will give me information on the American Red Cross in England during the Second World War?

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